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Cats could be BANNED from going outside under new rules in Australia

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The nationwide crackdown on cats has drawn closer after a new study found they kill billions of native Australian animals every year.

Research has shown that each wildcat kills more than 740 local wildlife creatures each year, but even pet cats can kill an average of 180 each year, which is vastly higher than previous estimates of just 75 per year.

Across the country, every day, three million mammals, two million reptiles and one million marsupials die from attacks by feral and domestic cats.

Now, authorities across the country are enforcing restrictions in an effort to curb cat slaughter.

A nationwide crackdown on cats has drawn closer after a new study found they kill billions of native Australian animals each year (pictured)

A nationwide crackdown on cats has drawn closer after a new study found they kill billions of native Australian animals each year (pictured)

Cat breeder Pamela Lanigan (pictured) of Cats United WA blames stray cats or neighborhood cats, cared for by several households on a street, for most of the attacks from wild animals

Cat breeder Pamela Lanigan (pictured) of Cats United WA blames stray cats or neighborhood cats, cared for by several households on a street, for most of the attacks from wild animals

Canberra already plans to return all new cats indoors only from mid-2022 or their owners could face fines of $ 1,600, while residents of Bendigo in Victoria must now always keep their cats in their homes. property or pay $ 120 to collect it from the caretakers.

Cats from the Adelaide Hills in South Australia are prohibited from going out from 8 p.m. to 7 a.m., while cats from Western Australia in Fremantle will be prohibited from public areas.

The new rules have yet to be approved by the Washington state parliament, but if passed, cats will be banned from roads, shoulders and trails except on a leash.

Cat owners already face fines of $ 200 if their cats get lost in the council’s bush, and could now be extended to all council lands.

The rules align cats with dogs and will effectively see them confined to the home, with some believing this will be the catalyst for national restrictions.

Canberra already plans to return all new cats indoors only from mid-2022, while residents of Bendigo in Victoria must now always keep their cats on their property.

Canberra already plans to return all new cats indoors only from mid-2022, while residents of Bendigo in Victoria must now always keep their cats on their property.

Catios (pictured) are huge backyard enclosures for cats, to give them some freedom and keep them engaged with places to run, explore and hide

Catios (pictured) are huge backyard enclosures for cats, to give them some freedom and keep them engaged with places to run, explore and hide

HOW TO PREVENT YOUR CAT FROM KILLING

Keep your cat indoors.

β€œYou will find that the cats in the house are much softer, they are much calmer because they don’t fight with other cats,” said WA Wildlife Hospital director of operations Dean Huxley.

β€œCats adapt very well. Once people see that their cats are happier and healthier, they will start to make this change.

Build a “catio”

Catios are massive backyard enclosures for cats, to give them some freedom and keep them occupied with places to run, explore and hide.

Teach your cat to walk on a leash

Some cats love to wear a harness with a leash and walk with their owner, or sit on their shoulder. Others prefer to be pushed into a suitable sealed stroller that allows them to supervise while being safe from dogs or running away.

“I think cats will be indoors like dogs soon,” Fremantle City Councilor Adin Lang told ABC.

β€œOur future generations will look back and say, ‘You let cats roam Australia, eating all of our wildlife for all these years? ”

β€œIt’s about protecting our wildlife and it’s also about helping protect people’s cats from cat fights or collisions with cars.

“What this means is that if the rangers see cats on the trails or see cats on the roads, a fine could be imposed on the owner, much like a fine is imposed on a dog owner whose dog is off leash. “

Research using GPS trackers has found that even domestic cats travel much further than previously thought on hunting expeditions in their area.

“Pet cat owners aren’t always as aware of their pet’s movements as they think they are,” said Sarah Legge, professor at Australian National University, who co-wrote Cats in Australia: Companion and Killer .

“There is a lot of variation between pet cats and the amount of wild animals they kill – some cats don’t kill wild animals, but other cats kill huge numbers of wild animals. .

“But for pets, the management options are very different – you’re not going to go out and throw poison bait in the suburbs and run shooting programs.”

The proposals have been widely welcomed by many cat owners and breeders who want more emphasis on responsible pet ownership.

Cat breeder Pamela Lanigan of Cats United WA blames stray cats or neighborhood cats, taken in by several households on a street, for most of the attacks from wild animals.

But she still thinks the councils and many owners could do more to protect native animals and their own pets by subsidizing deexing for low-income people.

Ms Lanigan also supports a controversial trap-neuter-release program for feral cats that sees the council catch feral cats and deexex them before putting them back into the wild.

Across the country, every day, three million mammals, two million reptiles and one million marsupials die from attacks by feral cats and pets

Across the country, every day, three million mammals, two million reptiles and one million marsupials die from attacks by feral cats and pets

Fremantle's advisor Adin Lang (pictured) thinks it's only a matter of time before all cats are kept inside

Fremantle’s advisor Adin Lang (pictured) thinks it’s only a matter of time before all cats are kept inside

Research has shown that each wildcat kills 740 local wildlife creatures each year, but even pet cats can kill 180 on average each year.

Research has shown that each wildcat kills 740 local wildlife creatures each year, but even pet cats can kill 180 on average each year.

β€œThey can’t reproduce anymore, but they will prevent other cats from entering this environment, and that’s something that is done a lot in America,” she said.

Councilor Lang added, “If we can introduce the laws as a measure, but also introduce other incentives to try to help people, then I think it will be absolutely helpful.”

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